Alerting Survival Strategies
July 24, 2014

Larry Haig
Intechnica

Share this

(aka – “If that monitoring system wakes me up at 3am one more time … !”)

In considering alerting, the core issue is not whether a given tool will generate alerts, as anything sensible certainly will. Rather, the central problem is what could be termed the actionability of the alerts generated. Failure to flag issues related to poor performance is a clear no-no, but unfortunately over-alerting has the same effect, as these will rapidly be ignored.

Effective alert definition hinges on the determination of “normal” performance. Simplistically, this can be understood by testing across a business cycle (ideally, a minimum of 3-4 weeks). That is fine providing performance is reasonably stable. However, that is often not the case, particularly for applications experiencing large fluctuations in demand at different times of the day, week or year.

In such cases (which are extremely common), the difficulty becomes “at which point of the demand cycle should I base my alert threshold?” Too low, and your system is simply telling you that it’s lunchtime (or the weekend, or whenever greatest demand occurs). Too high, and you will miss issues occurring during periods of lower demand.

There are several approaches to this difficulty, of varying degrees of elegance:

■ Select tooling incorporating a sophisticated baseline algorithm - capable of applying alert thresholds dynamically based on time of day/week/month etc. Surprisingly, many major tools use extremely simplistic baseline models, but some (e.g. App Dynamics APM) certainly have an approach that assists. When selecting tooling, this is definitely an area that repays investigation.

■ Set up independent parallel (active monitoring) tests separated by “maintenance windows”, with different alert thresholds applied depending upon when they are run. This is a messy approach which comes with its own problems.

■ Look for proxies other than pure performance as alert metrics. Using this approach, a “catchall” performance threshold is set for performance that is manifestly poor regardless of when it is generated. This is supplemented by alerting based upon other factors flagging delivery issues – always providing that your monitoring system permits these. Examples include:

- Payload – error pages or partial downloads will have lower byte counts. Redirect failures (e.g. to mobile devices) will have higher than expected page weights.

- Number of objects

- Specific “flag” objects

■ Ensure confirmation before triggering alert. Some tooling will automatically generate confirmatory repeat testing; others enable triggers to be based on a specified number or percentage of total node results.

■ Gotchas – take account of these. Good test design, for example by controlling the bandwidth of end user testing to screen out results based on low connectivity tests, will improve the reliability of both alerts and results generally. As a more recent innovation, the advent of long polling / server push content can be extremely distortive of synthetic external responses, especially if not consistently included. In this case, page load end points need to be defined and incorporated into test scripts to prevent false positive alerts.

RUM based alerting presents its own difficulties. Because it is visitor traffic based, alert triggers based on a certain percentage of outliers may become distorted in very low traffic conditions. For example, a single long delivery time in a 10 minute timeslot where there are only 4 other “normal” visits would represent 20% of total traffic, whereas the same outlier recorded during a peak business period with 200 normal results is less than 1% of the total. RUM tooling that enables alert thresholds to be modified based on traffic are advantageous.

Although it does not address the “normal variation” issue, replacing binary trigger thresholds with dynamic ones (i.e. an alert state exists when the page/transaction slows by more than x% compared to its average over the past) can sometimes be useful.

Some form of trend state messaging (that is, condition worsening/improving) subsequent to initial alerting can serve to mitigate the amount of physical and emotional energy invoked by simple “fire alarm” alerting, particularly in the middle of the night.

An interesting (and long overdue) approach is to work directly on the source of the problem – download raw baseline data to a data warehouse, and apply sophisticated pattern recognition analysis. These algorithms can be developed in-house if time and appropriate skills are available, but unfortunately the mathematics is not necessarily trivial. Some standalone tooling exists and it is expected that more will follow as this approach proves its worth – the baseline management of most APM vendors represents an open goal at present.

Incidentally, such analysis is valuable not only for alerting but also for demand projection and capacity planning.

A few final thoughts on alerts post-generation. The more evolved alert management systems will permit conditional escalation of alerts – that is: alert this primary group first, then inform group B if the condition persists/worsens etc. Systems allowing custom coding around alerts (such as Neustar) are useful here, as are the specific third party alert handling systems available. If using tooling that only permits basic alerting, it is worth considering integration with external alerting, either of the “standalone service” type, or (in larger corporates) integral with central infrastructure management software.

Lastly, delivery mode. Email is the basis for many systems. It is tempting to regard SMS texting as beneficial, particularly in extreme cases. However, as anyone who has been sent a text on New Year’s Eve, only to have it show up 12 hours later knows, such store and forward systems can be false friends.

Larry Haig is Senior Consultant at Intechnica.

Share this

The Latest

July 19, 2018

According to a recent survey, critical IT incidents cost the average organization upwards of $6 million per year. This infographic outlines 4 easy steps to automate incident management, reducing downtime and costs to organizations ...

July 17, 2018

The essential value resulting from data-driven processes has become progressively linked with analytics. Once considered a desired complement to intuitive decision-making, analytics has developed into a main focus of mission-critical applications across industries for any number of use cases ...

July 16, 2018

The question of SaaS-based technology over the past decade has quickly changed from "should we?" to "how soon can we?" even for the most customized and regulated of industries. This macro move toward SaaS has also encouraged a series of IT "best practices" that have potential impacts on the employee digital experience, organizational risk and ultimately, productivity ...

July 11, 2018

Optimization means improving the performance of your human and technology resources while keeping a watchful eye. To accomplish this, we must have clear, crisp visibility into the metrics relevant to the delivery of workspace applications to your end users and to the devices – the endpoints – they use to be productive ...

July 09, 2018

As tech headlines flash across my email, the CMDB, and its federated equivalent, the CMS, are almost never mentioned. And yet when I do research, dialog with IT, or support our consulting team, the CMDB/CMS many times still remains paramount ...

June 28, 2018

Given the size and complexity of today's IT networks it can be almost impossible to detect just when and where a security breach or network failure might occur. It's critical, therefore, that businesses have complete visibility over their IT networks, and any applications and services that run on those networks, in order to protect their customers' information, assure uninterrupted service delivery and, of course, comply with the GDPR ...

June 27, 2018

A new breed of solution has been born that simultaneously provides the precision of packet-based analytics with the speed of flow-based monitoring (at a reasonable cost). Here are more reasons to use these new NPM/APM analytics solutions ...

June 26, 2018

A new breed of solution has been born that simultaneously provides the precision of packet-based analytics with the speed of flow-based monitoring (at a reasonable cost). Here are 6 reasons to use these new NPM/APM analytics solutions ...

June 21, 2018

There’s no doubt that digital innovations are transforming industries, and business leaders are left with little or no choice – either embrace digital processes or suffer the consequences and get left behind ...

June 20, 2018

Looking ahead to the rest of 2018 and beyond, it seems like many of the trends that shaped 2017 are set to continue, with the key difference being in how they evolve and shift as they become mainstream. Five key factors defining the progression of the digital transformation movement are ...